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We provide highly personalised coaching for IELTS / TOEFL / GRE / GMAT / SAT

Advantages of studying IELTS / TOEFL / GRE / GMAT / SAT at Zest :-
   
  • Personalised Quality Teaching
  • No Fixed Course Duration (Upto the examination Date we continue our Coaching)
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  • Speaking Through Audio and Video Recordings
  • Group Discussions and Personal Interviews
  • No Outside Faculty
  • We are Authorised Input Nodal Agent for IDP - AUSTRALIA : Test Center - Planet edu
  • Special Attention on Gujarati Medium Students
  • Highest Success Ratio (Our Gujarati Medium Students to have Secured 7 Bands in IELTS)
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IELTS (The International English Language Testing System)
        IELTS was introduced in 1989 and at present it is widely recognised as a reliable means of assessing whether candidates are ready to study or train in the medium of English. It also helps universities and colleges to assess the English skills of candidates wishing to study or train in the English language. It is also used as a general test of English for immigration and employment in many English Speaking Countries like U.K., Australia, etc.

           IELTS is owned by three partners, the university of Cambridge ESOL examinations, the British Council and IDP Education Australia.

There are two versions of IELTS test :- (i) Academic and (ii) General Training

The Academic IELTS test is for individuals who plan to study in English at Undergraduate or Postgraduate level or for professional reasons and is designed to test the understanding and use of complex academic language, while The General Training IELTS test is for entry to vocational or training  programme not at degree level, for admission to Secondary Schools and for employment or immigration purposes.

        This test is divided into four sections (i) Listening (ii) Reading (iii) Writing and (iv) Speaking

           Listening and Speaking tests are common for both candidates (i.e. Academic and General). However, reading and writing tests are different for Academic and General training.
 
  Format IELTS  
  Listening
4 Section , 40 Questions
30 Minutes
 
 
Academic Reading
3 Sections, 40 Questions
60 Minutes
or General Training Reading
3 Sections, 40 Questions,
60 Minutes
 
Academic Writing
2 Tasks
60 Minutes
or General Training Writing
2 Tasks
60 Minutes
 
   
  Speaking
One to one Interview
11 to 14 Minutes
 
     
(1) Listening :-
Listening is the first module of this test. There are four sections, each with ten questions. Candidates have to attend 40 questions in 30 minutes. The first two sections are concerned with social needs. There is a conversation between two speakers and then a monologue. The final two sections are concerned with situation related to educational or training context. There is a conversation between up to four people and then a monologue. The test is played once only. Hence, candidates hear the recording once only and answer the questions as they listen. At the end of section four candidates will be given 10 minutes to transfer their answers to the Listening Answer Sheet. So this test will last 40 minutes in total.
 
(2) Reading :-
(A) Academic :- This is the second part of the test and it consists of three sections with 40 questions and it takes 60 minutes. There are three reading passages, which are taken from magazines, journals, newspapers and books. The passages are on topics of general interest, and if technical language is used then simple definitions are provided.

 A variety of question types is used including : multiple choice, short-answer questions, sentence completion, notes / summary / flow-chart / table completion, labelling a diagram, classification, matching, choosing suitable paragraph heading from a list, identification of writer’s views/claims, yes-no-not given or identifiation of information in the text - true, false, not given. The text vary slightly. At least one of the three may contain a diagram, graph or illustration, and may also contain a detailed logical argument.

(B) General :- It consists of three or sometimes four reading passages with 40 questions to be completed within 60 minutes. Though the candidate can mark and write on the question paper, he/she must enter his/her answers on the Reading Answer Sheet and be aware that no extra time is given for transferring your answers.

The texts are generally taken from advertisements, notices, timetables, instruction manuals, leaflets, news papers, magazines and books, official documents(e.g. Pass Port), etc. The first section relates to social situations in an English-speaking context. The second section focuses on the training context and involves texts of more complex language. The third or fourth involves extended prose or articles using more complex structure, but with the emphasis on descriptive and instructive rather than argumentative texts.

There is a variety of question types used in this section, including multiple choice, short answer questions, table completion, flow-chart completion, sentence completion, notes, summary or gap-fill completion, labelling a diagram, matching headings or lists classification, identification of writer’s views/claims - yes, no, not given - or identification of information in the text - true, false, not given.

 

(3) Writing :-
(A) Academic :- This module lasts for 60 minutes and it consists of two tasks. It is suggested that candidates spend about twenty minutes on Task-I, which requires them to write at least 150 words, and forty minutes on Task-II, which requires them to write at least 250 words. These is no choice of question topics as they are both of academic interest and suitable for all candidates taking the IELTS Academic Module.

Task-I requires candidates to look at a diagram or some data (chart, table or graph) and to present the information in their own words. They may be assessed on their ability to organise, present and possibly compare data, describe the stages of a process, describe an object or event or explain how something works.

Task-II requires candidate to write at least 250 words candidates will be presented with a topic and will be tested on his/her ability to respond by giving and justifying an opinion, discussing the topic, summarising details, outlining problems, identifying possible solutions and supporting what he/she write with reasons, arguments adn relevant examples from his/her own experience and knowledge.        

Scores of writing are reported as whole bands. The performance descriptors used by examiners are confidential. Task-II carries more weight than Task-I, so condidate might like to start Task-II first. The skills on which candidates will be assessed are :- Appropriate, accurate and complete response addressing all parts of question, correct spelling and punctuation, grammatical accuracy, Range of vocabulary and sentence structure; examples and supporting evidence used, reasons and arguments, etc.


(B) General :- This is the third module consists of two tasks to be completed within 60 minutes. It is suggested that candidates spend about 20 minutes on Task-I, which required to write at least 150 words and 40 minutes on Task-II, which requires them to write at least 250 words. The assessment of Task-II carries more weight in marking than Task-I.
       
In Task-I candidates require to write a letter in response to a given problem or issue. They are assessed on their ability to engage in personal correspondence, elicit and provide general factual information, express needs, wants, likes and dislikes, and express opinions, complains etc.
       
In Task-II candidates will be presented with a topic and will be tested on their ability to respond by giving and justifying an opinion, discussing the topic, summarising details, outlining problems, identifying possible solutions and supporting what you write with reasons, arguments and relevant examples from your own knowledge or experience.
      
Scores of writing are reported as whole bands. The performance descriptors used by examiners are confidential. Task-II carries more weight than Task-I, So you might like to start Task-II first. The skills on which candidates will be assessed are : appropriate, accurate and complete responses addressing all parts of the question, correct spelling and punctuation, grammatical accuracy, range of vocabulary and sentence structure, examples and supporting evidence used, reasons and arguments, etc.

 

(4) Speaking :-
This is the last of the four tests in IELTS. This module consists of an oral interview between the candidate and an IELTS trained examiner. The interview is scheduled either in the afternoon, after the other IELTS papers or sometimes before or after one-two days of other papers. It generally takes between 11-14 minutes and is recorded on an audio cassette. The interviewer is a qualified teacher who has been trained as an IELTS examiner and approved by IDP IELTS Australia or the British Council.

There are three parts to the interview. In part-1, the examiner starts the test, introduces himself/herself and confirm the identity of the candidate within one minute. Then the examiner interviews candidate and he/she answers general questions about themselves, their home/ family, their jobs/studies/interests and a wide range of similar familiar topic areas. This part lasts between 3-4 minutes. In part-2, the candidate is given a task card with prompts and is asked to talk on a particular topic. The candidate has one minute to prepare and may write some notes if they wish. Then candidate starts to speak for one-two minutes on a given topic. The examiner might conclude by asking one or two rounding-off questions. In part-3, examiner generates a discussion relating to the topic introduced in part-2. The candidate is expected to generate longer responses to these questions. The discussion lasts between four and five minutes.

The examiner controls the test and leads the candidate through the three parts of the interview. There are two question types - Yes/No questions (Polar interrogatives) and “Wh-” questions.

Yes/No questions require a short answer, whereas “Wh_” questions (Where, When, Why) require a longer response.

This module assesses whether candidates can communicate effectively in English. There are four performance descriptors to which the examiner refer to determine the candidates IELTS Band level :- (1) Fluency and cohesion (2) Lexical Resource (range of vocabulary) (3) Grammatical Range and Accuracy and (4) Pronounciation, rythm, stress, intonation and the sounds of English.

 
The Next Generation TOEFL Test
The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is a standardized test that measures the English proficiency of students who wish to enter college and university programs in the United States and Canada. The TOEFL is produced and administered by Educational Testing Service, a professional test development organization is Princeton, New Jersey, USA.

The Next Generation TOEFL Test is the Internet-based test (iBT) introduced worldwide in September 2005. This new version of the test replaces the earlier computer-based TOEFL Test (CBT). The new test has four sections covering the language skills of reading, listening, speaking and writing. The test is approximately 3 1/2 hours long, with one 10-minute break after the listening section.
 
NEXT GENERATION TIEFL iBT
Section Content Number of Questions Approximate Time
Reading 3 passages 36-42 60 minutes
Listening 2conversations   
  4 lectures
34 60 minutes
Speaking 2 independent tasks
4 integrated-skills tasks
6 20 minutes
Writing 1 integrated-skills task
1 independent task
2 60 minutes
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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